Author Topic: Making Sense of Ganymede  (Read 37164 times)

icebear

  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 140
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2014, 05:41:54 PM »
Do you think if we land there that we might find frozen animals, vegetation and even people there or at least the fossils?

I'd view that as highly likely.  Mars, Phobos, and Ganymede should be viewed as mandatory targets for exploration.

Batterytrain

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2014, 06:43:53 PM »
How do you explain the fact that the Dogon and various other cultures have myths surrounding other stars and planets such as the Sirius system? How do humans share so much DNA with other life on planet Earth if they were to come from a different planet? How would humans had to have been transported here if they were from Ganymede? Humans have fur in the form of hair and beards, some humans have large eyes like Green, Hazel, Blue etc, so then how would you explain that?

icebear

  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 140
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2014, 08:26:12 PM »
How do you explain the fact that the Dogon and various other cultures have myths surrounding other stars and planets such as the Sirius system? How do humans share so much DNA with other life on planet Earth if they were to come from a different planet?

Congratulations, you've just discovered the problem which Cosmos in Collision presents for evolutionists...

An evolutionist would expect that a living world on another planet would resemble our living world in no way, shape, or fashion.  Finding (on another planet) similar creatures with the same RNA/DNA basis and the same general body parameters (four limbs, a mouth, two ears, two eyes, two nostrils...) as our own world offers, forces the evolutionist to ask the obvious question about probabilities.

No human has eyes anything like those indicated by dinosaur and hominid fossils.

Rob Gargett ('Subversive Archaeologist') notes that even if you try to draw a humanized Neanderthal with the eyes and nose as large as the bones indicate, you still end up with something outlandish:


Image courtesy Rob Gargett, Subversive Archaeologist blogspot

And Danny Vendramini's reconstructions show what you'd actually be looking at:


Courtesy www.themandus.org, Danny Vendramini

No human eyes are remotely close to being that big.  Human eyes are made for a bright world, hominid eyes were made for a very dark sort of a world, i.e. for this world 60,000 years ago.

http://saturndeathcult.com/the-sturn-death-cult-part-1/a-timeless-age-in-a-purple-haze/











Batterytrain

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2014, 04:48:41 AM »
So you are saying there was some sort of a convergent evolution where the different species ended up having common DNA on different planets? What I'm trying to wrap my head around is how humans would be transported here. I haven't bought the book yet but how could humans travel through space to Earth through currents? I am willing to accept some sort of an alien third party but then the average laymen guy is not.

Aren't Northern Europeans and various Caucasian groups adapted to a cold weak light environment? They are more hairy and have different eye colors combined with light eyes that are large eye sockets or are they just recent mutations to be seen as something ancestral?
« Last Edit: March 08, 2014, 04:52:34 AM by Batterytrain »

icebear

  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 140
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2014, 01:44:47 PM »
So you are saying there was some sort of a convergent evolution where the different species ended up having common DNA on different planets?

We're not preaching "convergent evolution".  What we are preaching is that our entire living world is based on a highly complex information system and that that system appears to be universal.  The fact of having the same RNA/DNA code and roughly the same kinds of creatures on two totally separated solar systems (or at least on the two totally separate parts of our original system) has to constitute a gigantic problem for evolutionists since the law of averages would appear to prohibit such a thing.

The fruit fly experiments beginning in the early decades of the 1900s should have been the end of evolution(ism). Fruit flies breed new generations every other day so that running any sort of a decades-long experiment with fruit flies will involve more generations of them than there have ever been of anything even remotely resembling humans on our planet. Those flies were subjected to everything in the world known to cause mutations and the mutants were recombined every possible way; all they ever got were sterile freaks, and fruit flies. Several prominent scientists publicly denounced evolution at that point in time including the famous case of Richard Goldschmidt.

The failure was due to the fact that our entire living world is driven by information and the only information there ever was in the picture was that for a fruit fly. When the DNA/RNA information scheme was discovered, even if the fruit fly thing had never happened, evolution should have been discarded on the spot. But GIVEN the fact of the fruit fly experiments, somebody HAD to have thought to himself

Quote
"Hey, THAT'S THE REASON THE FRUIT FLY EXPERIMENTS FAILED!!!!!!"

The problem is magnified many times when the evolutionist also has to explain how the same information system would arise more than once in totally separated places, when the only mechanism allowed is random processes.

Quote
What I'm trying to wrap my head around is how humans would be transported here. I haven't bought the book yet but how could humans travel through space to Earth through currents? I am willing to accept some sort of an alien third party but then the average laymen guy is not.

Neither Troy nor I own a time machine (I keep watching for them on Ebay) and so we cannot say for sure how humans got to Earth from Ganymede.  What we know about Phobos indicates that at least somebody in our ancient system was space faring:

http://cosmosincollision.com/forum/index.php?topic=18.0

and there is the further possibility of what Troy and I call "splash saltations" which the book goes into to some extent.  The ancient system (our section of it) was axially aligned rather than rotational and there was a possibility of living creatures simply being sucked up by the vortex of one of those Birkeland current segments and ending up in another world.

What Troy and I DO answer is the question of WHEN and under what circumstances those kinds of transfers would have been possible.  That line of reasoning answers the question as to the multi-thousand-year time gap between Cro Magnon man and the people of Genesis and why the two basic human groups would be genetically all but identical and yet have cultures and technologies which were totally different.

Quote
Aren't Northern Europeans and various Caucasian groups adapted to a cold weak light environment? They are more hairy and have different eye colors combined with light eyes that are large eye sockets or are they just recent mutations to be seen as something ancestral?

Compared to the situation in other animals, there is terribly little genetic variation amongst modern humans, some say less than in a typical group of African monkeys of the same species.  Scholars who study the problem speak of a population bottleneck some 45,000 years ago to explain this lack of diversity.  Other than that, no human eyes either present or in the distant past ever resembled what you see in hominids, whose eyes were made for the deep purple world which Troy describes:

http://saturndeathcult.com/the-sturn-death-cult-part-1/a-timeless-age-in-a-purple-haze/








Batterytrain

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #20 on: March 14, 2014, 02:29:44 AM »
http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showthread.php/41384-Were-Relations-Between-Neanderthals-And-Humans-Hostile-or-Friendly/page2

Here is a topic about human Neanderthal interaction, new research suggests that humans share almost 95% DNA with Neanderthals.

« Last Edit: March 15, 2014, 07:01:53 PM by Batterytrain »

icebear

  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 140
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2014, 11:29:00 AM »
http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showthread.php/41384-Were-Relations-Between-Neanderthals-And-Humans-Hostile-or-Friendly/page2

Here is a topic about human Neanderthal interaction, new research suggests that Neanderthals share almost 95% DNA with Neanderthals.

Actually, we share some 50% of our DNA with bananas.  Paabo is claiming that Neanderthal genes found in humans indicate interbreeding/cross-breeding in past ages.  Troy and I rule that out for a number of reasons and you can read some of that in the thread on "cave men" in the forum:

http://cosmosincollision.com/forum/index.php?topic=57.0

and in more detail in the book.  There's a Kindle version available for $10 and you don't need to own a Kindle to read it, Amazon has a downloadable (free) Kindle reader for PCs and Macs.

There is also a question (serious in fact) as to whatever Paabo claims to be seeing might have arisen from early humans EATING Neanderthals, rather than mating with them:

http://cosmosincollision.com/forum/index.php?topic=61.0


Pituxalina

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 43
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2014, 07:02:47 AM »
I would guess that the majority of plants on earth are native to earth because of the spectrum of saturn having very little green light. In fact earth plants are made for Saturn light, not our present sun. There are other plants with differing colors and those might be from Ganymede, am I right?

Again, Earth was dark in those times but had to have been bright enough for photosythesis to take place, and the way Saturn radiated light, the actual star and its plasmasphere would have been perfect for green plants at the time.

Batterytrain

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2014, 01:43:02 AM »
But the green plants are the sun adapted ones and the purple red ones are the Saturn descendants based on my understanding? How would humans have bought different plants from Ganymede?

icebear

  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 140
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #24 on: March 18, 2014, 12:15:55 PM »
I would guess that the majority of plants on earth are native to earth because of the spectrum of saturn having very little green light. In fact earth plants are made for Saturn light, not our present sun. There are other plants with differing colors and those might be from Ganymede, am I right?

Again, Earth was dark in those times but had to have been bright enough for photosythesis to take place, and the way Saturn radiated light, the actual star and its plasmasphere would have been perfect for green plants at the time.


I still don't have a time machine nor can tell anybody for sure which plants came from where, but it may be that the kinds of green veggies which kids all hate are the ones which are from where humans are not from, i.e. for which we are not adapted to eat.

The whole world knows that a little kid's basic reaction to alcohol and tobacco is correct:



I've never understood why anybody would think that same little kid's reaction to green veggies was wrong.  When something tastes bad, your body is trying to tell you something.  I mean, I've gotten to where I can eat some green veggies in Chinese food in later years, but I still have vivid memories of the way American women cooked green veggies in the 50s when Ike was president, i.e. cook them into a sort of a green glue and then try to flavor them to taste like C-rations and K-rations (the food they grew up with and loved in the depression and WW-II)...  Particularly if somebody was cooking asparagus, I had to leave the NEIGHBORHOOD, just leaving my own yard didn't cut it, I'd still get sick.

Given the sort of life which Cosmos in Collision posits for an original human home world, it seems fairly obvious that the basic original human diet was some combination of shellfish and fruit, with fish being added after humans developed spears and nets.  The sugar in fruits would have provided the energy for swimming, which humans do less efficiently than fish or marine mammals, and account for the remaining human taste for sweet things.  A cat would starve to death in a room full of cookies and candy.






« Last Edit: March 18, 2014, 12:19:17 PM by icebear »

Batterytrain

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2014, 04:06:39 PM »
So then how do you explain how humans share so much DNA with chimps, Orangutans and Gorillas, and how Denisovans fit into this theory? Did Cro Magnons kill Denisovans too? Papuans and Australian Aborigines share a lot of DNA with Denisovans, or did they attack Cro Magnons?

icebear

  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 140
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2014, 07:00:27 PM »
We apparently share around half of our DNA with bananas, so it just depends on how far back you want to go. 

The idea of macroevolution however has been thoroughly debunked so that the only real explanation for common DNA has to be design similarities and, in some cases, genetic re-engineering similar to what you see in what you call "kit cars" in which a company sells the parts needed to take an old VW beatle frame and engine and make them look like an MGTD or some other classic sports car. 

Again from Cosmos in Collision, for any hominid to have evolved into a human on this planet, the hominid would need to have lost:
  • His fur while ice ages were going on.
  • Almost all of his night vision while trying to survive on the ground amongst predators which could see in the dark and in an age in which daylight didn't really exist.
  • Almost all of his sense of smell while trying to survive as a land prey animal.

In other words, the idea of human descent from hominids doesn't work.


Batterytrain

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #27 on: April 04, 2014, 09:18:02 PM »
http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showthread.php/41569-German-Dziebel-s-Out-of-America-origin-of-humanity-urheimat-hypothesis

Here is where I am drawing it from, this is a thread about disproving Out of Africa. How do you explain the genetic diversity of tribes and these monkeys Vis a Vis human DNA.

icebear

  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 140
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #28 on: April 05, 2014, 01:19:12 PM »
Forumbiodiversity.com appears to be an extreme example of what I would call an over-moderated forum.  Last night I registered and posted a single reply to the thread you mention;  their response as of this morning:

Quote
You have been banned for the following reason:
Quality Before Stupidity

Date the ban will be lifted: Never

I don't really have any use for over-moderated forums. 

icebear

  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 140
    • View Profile
Re: Making Sense of Ganymede
« Reply #29 on: April 05, 2014, 01:23:29 PM »
http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showthread.php/41569-German-Dziebel-s-Out-of-America-origin-of-humanity-urheimat-hypothesis

Here is where I am drawing it from, this is a thread about disproving Out of Africa. How do you explain the genetic diversity of tribes and these monkeys Vis a Vis human DNA.

Monkeys apparently have a great deal more genetic diversity than humans do which is what you'd expect if monkeys are native to this planet.  The human saltations, particularly if splash saltation is was the basic means in question, most likely involved limited numbers of people.